Talquetamab

Overview

Talquetamab (JNJ-64407564) is a bispecific antibody binds to both CD3 on T cells and GPRC5D expressed on certain tumor cells.

SparkCures ID 306
Developed By Janssen Research & Development
Generic Name Talquetamab
Additional Names JNJ-64407564
Treatment Classifications
Treatment Targets

Clinical Trials

All Clinical Trials

View all active clinical trials around the US.

Early Relapse Multiple Myeloma

The following is a listing of clinical trials for patients with multiple myeloma who have received one to two prior lines of therapy.

Late Relapse Multiple Myeloma

The following is a listing of clinical trials for patients with multiple myeloma who have received three or more prior lines of therapy.

Smoldering Myeloma
Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)

Published Results

Updated Phase 1 Results from MonumenTAL-1: First-in-Human Study of Talquetamab, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family C Group 5 Member D x CD3 Bispecific Antibody, in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

December 11, 2021

As of July 19, 2021, 95 patients have received SC talquetamab. The RP2D was originally identified as a weekly SC dose of 405 µg/kg talquetamab with step-up doses. However, alternative dosing schedules that require less frequent administration continue to be investigated. A biweekly RP2D was also identified as an SC dose of 800 µg/kg talquetamab with step-up doses.

30 patients received the 405 µg/kg weekly dosing schedule (median age: 61.5 years [range 46–80]; 63% male; 100% triple-class exposed; 80% penta-drug exposed; 77% triple-class refractory, 20% penta-drug refractory; 30% prior BCMA-directed therapy; median follow-up: 7.5 mo [range 0.9–15.2]). 23 patients received the 800 µg/kg biweekly dosing schedule (median age: 60.0 years [range 47–84]; 48% male; 96% triple-class exposed; 70% penta-drug exposed; 65% triple-class refractory, 22% penta-drug refractory; 17% prior BCMA-directed therapy; median follow-up 3.7 mo [range 0.0–12.0]).

There were no treatment discontinuations due to AEs at either of the RP2Ds. The most common AEs at the 405 µg/kg weekly dose were CRS (73%; 1 patient had grade 3 CRS), neutropenia (67%; grade 3/4: 60%), and dysgeusia (60%; grade 2: 29%); skin-related AEs occurred in 77% (all grade 1/2; nail disorders: 30%) of patients, and infections occurred in 37% of patients (1 patient had grade 3 COVID-19 pneumonia). The most common AEs at the 800 µg/kg biweekly dose were CRS (78%; all grade 1/2), dry mouth (44%; all grade 1/2), and neutropenia (44%; grade 3/4: 35%); skin-related AEs occurred in 65% of patients (grade 3: 13%; nail disorders: 17%) and infections occurred in 13% of patients (1 patient had grade 3 pneumococcal sepsis).

In 30 response-evaluable patients treated with the 405 µg/kg weekly dose, the overall response rate (ORR) was 70% (very good partial response or better [≥VGPR] rate: 57%). In 17 response-evaluable patients treated with the 800 µg/kg biweekly dose, the ORR was 71% (≥VGPR rate: 53%). Responses were durable and deepened over time in both cohorts (Figure). Median duration of response (DOR) was not reached at either RP2D; the 6-month DOR rate for patients who received the 405 µg/kg weekly dose was 67% [95% CI: 41–84]. Serum trough levels of talquetamab were comparable at both RP2Ds. Consistent with the mechanism of action for talquetamab, pharmacodynamic data from cohorts treated at both dose levels showed peripheral T-cell activation and induction of cytokines.

Resources